Polyps and enlarged tonsils

What are polyps?

A polyp is actually a protuberance of the mucous membrane, for example in the intestine or in the nose. Much more popular but are often enlarged in children throat tonsils, which are also popularly called polyps. In the correct medical German they are called adenoids or pharyngeal tonsil hyperplasia. But since even doctors are tongue twisters, they also tend to call enlarged throat tonsils polyps.

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What are typical symptoms of polyps?

The polyps, which are actually thickened throat algae, cause the following typical symptoms in children:

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What can be done against polyps?

If your child has been diagnosed with enlarged tonsils (polyps), it is recommended to use measures to strengthen his body's defenses, such as:

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What are the causes of enlarged tonsils (polyps)?

Both the throat and the palatine tonsils are often enlarged, especially in children between the ages of 3 and 7 years. The reason, according to the experts, is an increased incidence of nasopharyngeal infections at this age. The "polyps" are then only a visible sign of active defense and reconstruction work of the learning immune system. To a certain extent, the enlarged tonsils are therefore considered normal findings, without having to treat them.

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Should polyps be removed as soon as possible?

No. At least not before the 3rd birthday. Because if you remove enlarged pharyngeal tonsils (usually called polyps) earlier, they can regrow again. This does not happen after the third year of life. Moreover, surgical removal of the polyps is only necessary in exceptional cases anyway.

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Why can polyps sometimes lead to chronic middle ear infections?

This has to do with the anatomical conditions: Immediately next to the pharyngeal tonsils is the entrance to the middle ear, the mouth of the Eustachian tube. It is problematic if the enlarged pharyngeal tonsils (polyps) lay this opening and thereby lead to a ventilation disturbance of these so-called tubes.

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Are enlarged tonsils (tonsillar hyperplasia) in infants a disease?

No, in most cases enlarged thumbs or tonsils do not cause any problems, but to some extent are considered normal in toddlers and even adolescents. Enlarged palatine tonsils (medical: tonsillar hyperplasia) are an indication of the frequent involvement with pathogens. Infants in particular are affected as their immune system still has to learn how to ward off viruses and bacteria.

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Tonsillar hyperplasia: Remove almonds or just reduce them?

Times are changing and so are the medical findings, assessments and procedures. In the case of enlarged almonds, in the past only a complete removal of the same was possible. The utility of these lymphatic organs was assigned a rather negligible importance.

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How does the polyp test?

Does my child have polyps? Many parents ask themselves this question if their child breates more often or if they have conspicuous frequent colds. You can test it yourself with a simple trick. Admittedly, the method is not 100% secure, but it's wonderfully easy and always worth a try.

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Polyp removal: Does one not need the palatine tonsils for the defense?

No. If your child suffers from enlarged tonsils (falsely, but popularly referred to as polyps) - ie has actual and serious complaints - should be treated by the ENT specialist. In the absence of improvement and appropriate medical advice, you can have the removal of the enlarged pharyngeal tonsils done with a clear conscience.

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What is a tube ventilation disorder?

If the entrance to the tube or eustachian tube (Eustachian tube) is misplaced, there is a ventilation disturbance of the middle ear.The result may be a fluid accumulation in the middle ear (tympanic effusion), which leads to hearing loss.

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