fungal infections

How do you recognize an infection with a skin fungus?

There are several forms of skin fungus infections that also have a different appearance. However, typical characteristics of the rash in fungal infections are still present:

Read more: How do you recognize an infection with a skin fungus?

   

White pimples in the mouth in infants: mushrooms or Epstein pearls?

Probably Epstein pearls. Epstein beads (also called milia neonatorum) are pin-sized, whitish-yellow dots that appear in the transition between the hard and soft palate (i.e., on the oral cavity roof and on the gums).

Read more: White pimples in the mouth of babies: mushrooms or Epstein pearls?

   

What is a thrush?

Thrush is the generally harmless but unpleasant disease of the skin and mucous membranes caused by yeast fungi, which in most cases are Candida species, especially Candida albicans.

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How do I recognize an oral thrush with my child?

The oral thrush is recognizable by whitish, non-wipeable coverings on the oral mucosa and tongue. The fungal infection in the mouth often causes no abnormal symptoms in infants, but sometimes it leads due to the inflammation to pain-related drinking difficulties.

Read more: How do I recognize an oral thrush with my child?

   

How is the oral thrush treated?

The oral thrush is a relatively common fungal infection, which is externally recognizable on whitish evidence on oral and buccal mucosa. Often, a local immune deficiency is the cause, for example, after taking antibiotics or treatment with cortisone.

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When can a fungal infection (candidiasis) be dangerous for my child?

Usually the so-called yeast infection (candidiasis) is uncomfortable, but harmless. In immunocompromised children (for example, after chemotherapy), however, the fungus can also cause inflammation of the esophagus (= thrombosis of the esophagus), which is indicated by dysphagia and pain behind the sternum.

Read more: When can a fungal infection (candidiasis) be dangerous for my child?