The most important questions and answers about Crohn's disease & ulcerative colitis

Crohn's disease - ulcerative colitis

What are the criteria for assessing the activity of ulcerative colitis?

The disease activity in ulcerative colitis is divided according to current expert guidelines into three levels: mild, moderate and severe. The allocation is based on the following criteria:

Read more: What are the criteria for assessing the activity of ulcerative colitis?

   

Crohn's disease: how to prevent a relapse the safest?

Girl - Crohn's disease

Unfortunately, there is no such thing as a royal road to relapse prevention. An Crohn's disease can be so different for each individual and this process can be so badly predicted that a flat-rate prescription does not exist. But there are at least a few good pointers that you can follow.

Read more: Crohn's disease: how to prevent a relapse safest?

   

10 tips for Crohn's disease

My personal recommendations for those affected

There are no standard recommendations for Crohn's disease that are always valid for everyone. However, this disease is too different from person to person, and the course too heterogeneous.

Read more: 10 tips for Crohn's disease

   

Is blood in the stool a sign of ulcerative colitis?

Yes and no. Yes, because: In ulcerative colitis, there is a relatively high level of blood and mucus in the stool. If there is a suspicion of a chronic inflammatory bowel disease, blood in the stool is therefore an indication of ulcerative colitis.

Read more: Is blood in the stool a sign of ulcerative colitis?

   

Is Crohn's disease curable?

Unfortunately, no. However, it is possible for many people with Crohn's disease to reduce the disease to such an extent that it hardly interferes with normal life over long distances. Unfortunately, there are also sufferers who suffer more and more severe episodes and need more intensive treatment.

Read more: Is Crohn's disease curable?

   

In what way does azathioprine inhibit the immune system?

Azathioprine is a very strong immune blocker. It is used in various diseases that are associated with an excessive immune response. These include Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

Read more: In what way does azathioprine inhibit the immune system?

   

What is the difference between azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine?

Azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine are in principle two variants of the same active ingredient. Taking the drug azathioprine, it is converted into 6-mercaptopurine in the body. The latter unfolds then the actual effect, namely a very pronounced suppression of the immune system.

Read more: What is the difference between azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine?

   

When is treatment with azathioprine useful in the resting phase of Crohn's disease?

Azathioprine is a very strong immune blocker, which, like cortisone, suppresses inflammation in the intestine. The drug is sometimes prescribed for the acute onset of Crohn's disease, but it can also be an option during the resting period (remission). The goal is then: Remission conservation, so as long as possible to stop the disease-free phase by taking azathioprine.

Read more: When is treatment with azathioprine useful in the resting phase of Crohn's disease?

   

Do you need to take permanent cortisone for Crohn's disease?

No. In the acute phase of Crohn's disease, cortisone supplements are often prescribed to curb thrust. As a long-term therapy, cortisone is not the drug of choice. On the contrary, in the prevention of relapse, the long-term therapy with the so-called steroids is explicitly discouraged. First, because it has not been proven that cortisone preparations reduce the risk of relapse. On the other hand, because of the increasing danger of relevant side effects over time.

Read more: Do you have to take permanent cortisone for Crohn's disease?

   

Are there special diet recommendations for children with ulcerative colitis?

There is no special colitis diet. Your child may basically eat anything that he likes - with the restriction that applies to all children that the diet should be as balanced and healthy as possible on the whole.

Read more: Are there special diet recommendations for children with ulcerative colitis?

   

What can I do at home for my child with ulcerative colitis?

Of course, once the doctor has diagnosed ulcerative colitis in your child, the first step is to digest the diagnosis. But what you always have to be clear: Even if it is a chronic, incurable disease, but it is in the vast majority of cases quite treatable, so that symptomatic phases can be strongly limited in your child.

Read more: What can I do at home for my child with ulcerative colitis?

   

Which foods promote the formation of intestinal gases or flatulence?

A number of foods can promote the production of intestinal gases or flatulence. In the case of liquids, these are, for example, carbonated drinks, beer or sparkling wine, but also drinks with caffeine. Furthermore, fresh fruit, especially pears, may cause flatulence.

Read more: Which foods promote the formation of intestinal gases or flatulence?

   

What does remission really mean in Crohn's disease?

Remission means as much as disease arrest. That is, the disease still exists, but you can not feel it anymore. The term "remission" is also used in medicine in many other diseases that can potentially return. The opponent is the recurrence (= the relapse).

Read more: What does remission really mean in Crohn's disease?

   

Cortisone does not work: when is azathioprine or methotrexate, and when does infliximab?

It sometimes happens that cortisone therapy does not work for Crohn's disease. Then you have to resort to other medications that also suppress the immune system (immunosuppressants).

Read more: Cortisone is not effective: when is it more likely to use azathioprine or methotrexate, and when to use infliximab?

   

Crohn's disease: Does an acute relapse necessarily have to be treated with medication?

There are very exciting study results on this question: If an acute episode of Crohn's disease is treated only symptomatically (analgesics) or with dummy medications (placebo), 40% of those affected will be remorseful. So the thrust stops, without one of the usual immune blockers being taken.

Read more: Crohn's Disease: Does an Acute Intake Need to Be Medicated?

   

Is it possible to diagnose Crohn's disease using a stool sample?

That's not for sure. Nevertheless, the study of stool specimens in suspected Crohn's disease is important, if only to exclude other causes of intestinal distress (e.g., irritable bowel syndrome).

Read more: Is it possible to diagnose Crohn's disease using a stool sample?

   

How is a pancolitis treated, ie an extensive ulcerative colitis?

The term pancolitis refers to the infestation of the entire colon in ulcerative colitis. So there are inflammable foci detectable in every section of the large intestine.

Read more: How is a pancolitis treated, ie an extensive ulcerative colitis?

   

Ulcerative colitis: How is a proctitis (inflammation in the lowest part of the intestine) treated?

Proctitis, ie inflammation of the intestinal mucosa in the area just before the anus, is common in ulcerative colitis and often the first place where the disease manifests. First treatment is usually the external use of mesalazine (e.g., Claversal®Salofalk®).

Read more: Ulcerative colitis: How is a proctitis (inflammation in the lowest part of the intestine) treated?

   

Ulcerative colitis: Is it true that you can detect a disease boost on the pulse?

In a way, yes. High disease activity of ulcerative colitis is often associated with an increase in heart rate. A resting heart rate above 90 is considered a diagnostic criterion for a more severe episode.

Read more: Ulcerative Colitis: Is it true that you can recognize a disease boost on the pulse?

   

Do you have blood in your stool when you have Crohn's disease?

Rarely. Blood in the stool can sometimes occur in Crohn's disease, but is rather atypical.

Read more: Does Crohn's Disease Get Blood in the Chair?

   

Why is appendicitis treated differently in people with Crohn's disease than usual?

A disease of Crohn's disease is one of the few circumstances in which appendicitis (appendicitis) is not treated surgically if possible.

Read more: Why is appendicitis treated differently in people with Crohn's disease than usual?

   

Pregnant with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease: what should I watch out for when dieting?

That depends on the disease process. If there are no particular complications, the same nutritional recommendations apply to pregnant women with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease as to pregnant women without inflammatory bowel disease.

Read more: Pregnant with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease: what should I watch out for when it comes to nutrition?

   

Are there any foods that can cause halitosis?

Yes. There are foods that promote the production of odorous substances. These include, for example:

Read more: Are there any foods that can cause halitosis?

   

Which foods tend to counteract unpleasant odors?

Different foods can affect the formation of odors (as part of digestion) in both a positive and a negative sense. Responsible for this is the respective production of odorous substances.

Read more: Which foods tend to counteract unpleasant odors?

   

With which foods can you counteract flatulence?

Although many foods cause or promote the development of flatulence or intestinal gases. Luckily, there are some that do the opposite. These include, for example, blueberries and cranberries.

Read more: With which foods can you counteract flatulence?

   

Why do "rural children" suffer less frequently from ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease?

This is not clear yet. But very interesting. Although rural life does not fully protect against ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. But the risk for these inflammatory bowel disease seems to be lower, according to different studies, when you grow up in the village.

Read more: Why do "rural children" suffer less frequently from ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease?

   

Are there also physical exercises against fecal incontinence?

Yes. With targeted muscle training, e.g. strengthened the muscles responsible for the opening and closing of the anus, thus improving the control of bowel movements.

Read more: Are there any physical exercises to combat faecal incontinence?

   

What can I do against fecal incontinence?

Even if a fecal incontinence can significantly affect everyday life: Do not start to hide from the world. On the contrary, it is important that you leave your own four walls despite this small problem. Learn to plan ahead a little to avoid unpleasant situations.

Read more: What can I do against fecal incontinence?

   

What is a fecal incontinence?

Fecal incontinence is a symptom that can be found in ulcerative colitis, especially in advanced stages. It can no longer control the departure of stool or intestinal gases arbitrarily.

Read more: What is a fecal incontinence?

   

How can pain in Crohn's disease be alleviated?

Everybody experiences pain differently, and many learn to handle it successfully. For example, they avoid situations that trigger or amplify pain. In Crohn's disease, these can be, for example, stress or certain foods.

Read more: How can pain in Crohn's disease be alleviated?

   

Which painkillers can I take?

If you are in pain, painkillers can usually be reduced significantly or the pain can be completely eliminated with normal painkillers. In principle, however, you should at least talk to your doctor about which painkillers are most suitable for you.

Read more: Which painkillers can I take?

   

How can you experience a fatigue syndrome in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis?

There are a number of possible causes of fatigue (a type of fatigue syndrome) in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The clarification is important because the treatment of the trigger can lead to significant improvement in subjective well-being.

Read more: How can you experience a fatigue syndrome in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis?

   

Does acupuncture help with ulcerative colitis?

Tendential yes. Acupuncture is a method of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Certain skin points are irritated by needles, manually (acupressure) or by warming (moxibustion). This is to block the qis, the energy flow of the body, and the Xue, the blood dissolve, which in turn benefits the health.

Read more: Does acupuncture help with ulcerative colitis?

   

Is fish oil suitable for the treatment of ulcerative colitis?

Fish oil contains, among others, the long-chain and polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid). Both result in certain body cells producing less pro-inflammatory signaling.

Read more: Is fish oil suitable for the treatment of ulcerative colitis?

   

What medications are available for Crohn's disease?

There are quite a few medications. Which ones are suitable for you depends on various factors. It also plays a role in whether Crohn's disease has just blossomed or rests - and how much the disease affects you.

Read more: What medications are available for Crohn's disease?

   

Crohn's disease: How is an acute thrust treated with infestation of the lower small intestine?

That depends on the degree of inflammation. Experts recommend treatment with a locally acting glucocorticoid (Budenoside) in the case of Crohn's disease in the lower small intestine with a slight inflammatory activity. Local means here: The cortisone drug is released after the one in the small intestine and acts only at the place of action.

Read more: Crohn's disease: How is an acute stroke treated with infestation of the lower small intestine?

   

Acute thrust of Crohn's disease with infestation of the colon: how is treated?

That depends on the degree of inflammation. In mild to moderate inflammatory activity Crohn's disease in the colon can be treated with the drug sulfasalazine or only locally effective glucocorticoids (released in the small intestine cortisone preparations).

Read more: Acute thrust of Crohn's disease with infestation of the large intestine: how is treated?

   

Crohn's disease in the esophagus or stomach: how is a push treated?

In an acute episode of Crohn's disease with involvement of the esophagus usually so-called systemic glucocorticoids must be taken. This means cortisone tablets. So at least the recommendation in the official guidelines.

Read more: Crohn's disease in the esophagus or stomach: How is a push treated?

   

Which treatment options are available if cortisone preparations do not work in Crohn's disease?

It sometimes happens that in a Crohn's disease thrust cortisone preparations do not work despite adequate dosage and duration of use. Doctors call this situation a steroid refractory course. Then so-called immunosuppressants are an option.

Read more: What treatment options are available if cortisone preparations do not work on Crohn's disease?

   

What are typical symptoms of Crohn's disease?

The most common symptom of Crohn's disease is chronic diarrhea. Chronic means that diarrhea lasts for more than six weeks. Typical side effects are abdominal pain and weight loss.

Read more: What are typical complaints of Crohn's disease?