Prevention: The most important questions and answers

How safe is the Femidom in contraception?

Not as safe as the condom. You can reliably prevent with the Femidom (condom for the woman) only if you master the application perfectly. And she has the talent.

Read more: How safe is Femidom in contraception?

   

Who invented the condom?

That's unknown. It is often said that the inventor is Charles Goodyear. But this is wrong. The rubber explorer from the 19th century, later named after a famous tire company, made only the first rubber condom. But there were condoms before.

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Is there really less desire for sex with the pill?

That is controversial. There are studies that prove such a connection. Especially in the fertile days before ovulation seems the desire for sex without a hormonal contraception to be stronger than if you take the pill.

Read more: Is there really less desire for sex with the pill?

   

Which method of contraception is called "Catholic Roulette"?

The Knaus-Ogino method. This is a somewhat outdated form of natural contraception, which uses a rather complicated formula to calculate the fertile days. Obsolete because it can be calculated much more reliably today with the temperature method or even better with the symptothermal method.

Read more: Which method of contraception is called "Catholic Roulette"?

   

Natural contraception: in what were Mr. Knaus and Mr. Ogino at odds?

At the beginning of the last century (around 1923) the Japanese Kyusaku Ogino and the Austrian Herrmann Knaus wrote medicine history in a very strange way. They gave their name to a natural method of contraception, even though they disagreed completely.

Read more: Natural contraception: In what were Mr. Knaus and Mr. Ogino at odds?

   

What are the disadvantages of natural contraception (temperature method, billings method, symptothermal method)?

The biggest drawback of natural contraception is certainly the lack of protection. This means that in the fertile days around ovulation, you either have to resort to other aids such as condoms or have to do without sexual intercourse. And unfortunately, this is exactly the phase in which the sexual desire of many women is highest.

Read more: What are the disadvantages of natural contraception (temperature method, billings method, symptothermal method)?

   

What side effects can occur with Cerazette?

Cerazette® is a mini pill. In contrast to the classic pill, it contains no estrogen, but "only" a progestin. The active ingredient desogestrel is a close relative of the female sex hormone progesterone.

Read more: What side effects can occur with Cerazette?

   

What side effects does the pill have?

According to the leaflet scary many. Luckily, in reality, less so: in the absolute majority of women, only a few (or none at all) really do. The most common side effects of the pill are a slight weight gain and a slightly impaired sexual desire. However, both accompanying effects, if they occur, are usually temporary in nature. In the case of the reduced libido, it is still being investigated whether a prolonged intake of the pill can even have a lasting "loss-reducing effect".

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What are the advantages of the symptothermal method of contraception?

The somewhat cumbersome term "symptothermal method" describes a natural form of contraception. In principle, this is a combination of the temperature method and the billings method. By the regular, morning measurement of the body temperature (increase = fertile phase) and the additional assessment of the uterine mucus (liquid = fertile phase) one achieves a significantly higher safety than with either of the two methods alone.

Read more: What are the advantages of the symptothermal prevention method?

   

What is the basal body temperature?

The basal body temperature is the lowest body temperature in the normal daily rhythm. That typically turns on at night. If you measure your temperature right after waking up in the morning, that is usually (no fever) the basal body temperature.

Read more: What is the basal body temperature?

   

After whom was the billings method named?

After John Billings, an Australian doctor who died in 2007. He and his wife (Evelyn Billings) explored various forms of natural family planning in the 1960s, noting that the uterine mucus changes during the cycle. In infertile time, it is rather thick and dry, in the fertile period, the cervical mucus is then thinner or liquid. From this observation, the Billings method was developed, in which the woman regularly examines her uterine mucus.

Read more: After whom was the Billings method named?

   

What is a coitus interruptus?

With the term Coitus interruptus doctors describe one of the most insecure contraceptive methods that exist: namely to pull out the penis before it comes to orgasm and thus to ejaculation. So an ejaculation outside the vagina, at halfway safe distance. Not only is this potentially frustrating, at least for most men, it's not that easy and requires a lot of self-discipline.

Read more: What is a coitus interruptus?

   

What is the Pearl Index?

The Pearl Index says something about how safe a certain contraceptive method is. The calculation sounds very academic, but in principle is quite simple: If 100 women in the same way, how many of them are still pregnant a year later? The lower the value, the safer the contraceptive method.

Read more: What is the Pearl Index?

   

Does the pill make you fat or not?

It depends. Stupid answer, admittedly, but that's the way it is. Whether or not you gain weight while taking the pill depends very much on what type of pill you are taking. And a bit of coincidence. Some women are taking the same pills, others are not.

Read more: Does the pill make you fat or not?

   

What makes the symptothermal method as natural contraception so safe?

The symptothermal method combines several practices from natural family planning and serves to best limit the fertile period of contraception (and conversely, if you want to have children, you also have to optimize conception). By determining several body signs that change during the course of the female cycle, the method, when used correctly, is considered to be almost as safe as e.g. the pill.

Read more: What makes the symptothermal method as natural contraception so safe?

   

How exactly does the temperature method work?

The body temperature of the woman rises slightly after ovulation and remains constantly elevated by the thermal effect of the hormone progesterone until the end of the cycle. In the so-called temperature method, one makes use of this fact to determine when the fertile days are and when exactly the "safe time" begins.

Read more: How exactly does the temperature method work?

   

Is the temperature method safe enough?

Contrary to partially outdated claims that irregular sleep times, late-night alcohol consumption, stress or travel easily disturbs the temperature development, recent studies show that the disturbing influence here is usually rather low and the cycle curves are largely robust even among shift workers.

Read more: Is the temperature method safe enough?

   

When does the spiral come into question for emergency contraception?

In case of a desired emergency contraception after sexual intercourse, in most cases the pill will be taken afterwards. However, with the so-called copper spiral there is also an alternative method available here.

Read more: When does the spiral come into question for emergency contraception?

   

What should I watch out for when using the vaginal ring?

The handling of the vaginal ring, so the insertion and removal, is very easy with a little practice, about comparable to the use of tampons. If you have decided on the vaginal ring, you can in most cases start directly with it.

Read more: What should I watch out for when using the vaginal ring?

   

How does the three-month injection work and for whom is it particularly suitable?

In this contraceptive method, a so-called depot progestin, so a long-acting hormone preparation is injected every 3 months. Gestagen is a descendant of the body's female hormone progesterone, which is also called luteal hormone.

Read more: How does the three-month syringe work and for whom is it particularly suitable?

   

What is the vaginal ring and how does it work?

The vaginal ring is a flexible, soft and transparent plastic ring that continuously releases a small dose of estrogen and progesterone, preventing ovulation, much like the regular pill. Compared to the pill, however, the ring has a much lower dose of hormones, as they are absorbed directly into the blood via the vagina, bypassing the entire food tract.

Read more: What is the vaginal ring and how does it work?

   

Is the vaginal ring suitable for me?

A big advantage of the vaginal ring (NuvaRing® or Circlet®) is that you have over three weeks of effective and extremely safe contraceptive, but you do not have to think twice a day, but every day.

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How exactly does the pill work after that?

Over the decades, the so-called emergency contraception (ie the possibility of an unwanted pregnancy even after sexual intercourse still prevent contraception) has been steadily developed. Today, it is usually only necessary to take a usually well-tolerated tablet.

Read more: How exactly does the pill work afterwards?

   

In which period should I take the pill afterwards? How safe does she look?

If you decide to take the pill afterwards, you should act quickly. The sooner you take the tablet after unprotected intercourse, the higher the chances that an unwanted pregnancy can actually be prevented.

Read more: In which period should I take the pill afterwards? How safe does she look?

   

What is the pill after? In which cases can the intake be useful?

The pill after that is a hormone preparation, which can still prevent an unwanted pregnancy up to 5 days after unprotected sexual intercourse. In medicine, it is also called Postkoitalpille (Latin for "after intercourse").

Read more: What is the pill after? In which cases can the intake be useful?

   

How can I get the pill afterwards? Are any examinations necessary?

As in most other European countries, the pill will be available in the pharmacy from 15 March 2015 in Germany without a prescription. It no longer needs to be prescribed by a doctor. And even if you break the condom on the weekend, you no longer need to go to the emergency department of a hospital, but can provide on Saturday or in the night or Sunday service of pharmacies themselves.

Read more: How do I get the pill afterwards? Are any examinations necessary?